5 Succulents That Are Hardy to East Texas

5 Succulents That Are Hardy to East Texas

With winter coming up quickly, most succulents will need some sort of protection against the chilly air, or just brought inside where temperatures aren’t so low. However, these 5 succulents are ‘cool’ with the cool air and will be just fine when Jack Frost pays East Texas a visit!


A banana tree with green leaves

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Euphorbia

With colorful pink, green, or white modified leaves (that look like flowers!) and its blue-green foliage, this low-maintenance perennial is perfect for your beds, borders, or containers. Euphorbia is tough and offers outstanding heat and drought resistance. Instead of showy flower petals, euphorbia has modified leaves, called bracts. This plant is a vigorous grower, reaching 1-3 feet in height and 2 feet in width at maturity, so it can quickly fill a garden space.


Hens & Chicks

Sempervivum are succulent, rosette forming plants belonging to the Crassulaceae family. They are commonly known as Hens & Chicks, and are called this because of the high number of offspring they produce — thus, a Hen and all her Chicks! The main attraction of these plants is their colorful rosettes of leaves. The rosettes are most striking in the spring and summer but even in the winter when growth stops, many varieties remain attractively colored.


A close up of a flower garden

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‘Autumn Joy’ Sedum

Sedums have become one of the most popular hardy plants in our area. What’s not to like? They are easy to grow; their thick, succulent leaves make them drought tolerant and they grow in full sun to light shade. Tall, upright sedums form clumps of foliage with massive flower heads which develop in summer and bloom in the fall and then provide food for the birds during the winter.


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Delosperma (Also known as Ice Plant)

Best grown in FULL SUN, Delosperma is an easy-to-grow herbaceous perennial. It can tolerate dry soil, shallow-rocky soil, and even full-on droughts. Glossy red-purple flowers bloom continuously from early summer until fall, and stand out against its fleshy, emerald-green leaves. The bright flower color paired with the long-blooming season and evergreen foliage makes ‘Ice Plant’ an easy choice as a groundcover or for a rock garden. A vigorous grower, Delosperma can reach 3-6 inches in height and a spread of 24 inches (or more!) at maturity.


‘Ogon’ Stonecrop Sedum

A small mass of brilliant, evergreen, solid yellow-gold, succulent foliage flushed with pink provides a bold color accent in rock gardens, along rock walls, or in mixed succulent containers. Makes an excellent pathway filler or ground cover. Does BEST in partial sun, reaching a spread of 8-12 inches at maturity.


Camellias: Sasanqua vs. Japonica

Camellias: Sasanqua vs. Japonica

Camellias are showy plants, offering long lasting blooms during the late fall and winter, lasting well into the spring.  Their large flowers brighten up your landscape during those winter months when little else is blooming.  The blooms are profuse and cover the entire bush making it the superstar of any landscape. 

There are numerous species of Camellias but the most popular varieties grown are Camellia Sasasanqua and Camellia Japonica.   These 2 varieties have similarities in their flower color but bloom at different times of the season.  Camellia Sasanqua will bloom from late Fall through early January and Camellia Japonica will bloom January through early Spring.

Camellias are known as a shade loving plants, but the Sasanqua can handle some sun.  It’s smaller than the Japonica in overall size (6’ tall and wide to 10’ tall and 6’ wide) and has smaller leaves and flowers.  Blooms are 3” – 4” in diameter, are sweet smelling and usually have ruffled edges with a burst of yellow color in their center. 

Japonicas prefer shade and are taller (12’+ for old mature plants) than Sasanquas.  Their flowers boast more petals, are often 5” wide and are stunning.  A single bush can have well over 100 flowers for weeks, blooming consistently from January through early spring.    

Both varieties offer striation or multicolored blooms, but most camellias bloom in one of three colors – white, pink or red, – in many shades from the palest shell pink to rose pink to bright red. 

These slow growing evergreens are relatively care-free.  They should only require pruning after they finish blooming.  Fertilize at the same time and again in mid-summer.  Camellias are prone to Scale and treating yearly with a horticultural spray or drench will help control these pests.

Consider adding camellias to your landscape if you haven’t already.  By planting both varieties you can enjoy the “Queen of winter flowers” from late fall through Spring.